Why the Modi bull market is likely to continue

narendra_modiVivek Kaul  

If foreign investors into the Indian stock market are to be believed, India is currently in the midst of a Modi rally. Goldman Sachs had explained this phenomenon best in a note titled Modi-fying our view, published on November 5, 2013. “The BJP led National Democratic Alliance (NDA) could prevail in the next parliamentary elections that are due by May 2014. Equity investors tend to view the BJP as business-friendly, and the BJP’s prime ministerial candidate Narendra Modi (the current chief minister of Gujarat) as an agent of change. Current polls show Mr.Modi and the BJP as faring well in the five upcoming state elections, which are considered lead indicators for the general election next year. Even though the actual general election outcome is uncertain, the market could trade this favorably over the next 2 quarters, which argues for modifying our stance,” the Goldman Sachs note pointed out.
Every bull market has a theory behind it. But ultimately any market goes up when the amount of money being brought in by the buyers is more than the amount of money being taken out by the sellers. For the Indian stock market to continue going up, and for the so called “Modi” rally to continue, the foreign investors need to continue bringing in money into the country.
The foreign institutional investors have made a net investment of Rs 72,791 crore since the beginning of the year. During the same period the domestic institutional investors have net sold Rs 65,694 crore.
In fact, numbers for the month of November make for a very interesting read. The foreign institutional investors during the month have made a net investment of Rs 6108 crore. During the same period the domestic institutional investors have net sold stocks worth Rs 9376 crore.
Through this data we can conclude that foreign investors have been more bullish on Indian stocks than Indian investors. Why has that been the case?
A possible interpretation of this is that the domestic institutional investors are worried about the overall state of the Indian economy. The Goldman Sachs summarises these challenges well as “the macro challenges that India faces in terms of external and fiscal imbalances, high inflation and tight monetary policy.” And given this, they have been net sellers during the course of this year.
The foreign investors are not bothered about the state of the Indian economy and that is why they have been buying Indian stocks. Why is that? A possible explanation is the fact that they have access to all the “easy money” in the world at very low interest rates.
They have been borrowing and investing this money in the Indian as well as other stock markets all over the world. This has been possible because of all the money being printed by the Western central banks. This has led to a situation where there is enough money floating around in the financial system and hence, kept interest rates low.
So for the foreign investors to continue investing money in India, it is important that interest rates in the Western world continue to remain low. For that to happen the Western central banks need to continue printing money. And that is the most important condition for the so called “Modi” rally to continue.
In case of the United States, which has been printing $85 billion every month, the decision to continue the easy money policy rests primarily in the hands of Janet Yellen, who is currently the Vice Chair of the Federal Reserve of United States, the American central bank, and will take over as its next chairperson early next year.
So will she continue printing money? Jeremy Grantham, the chief investment strategist of GMO, and one of the most acclaimed hedge fund managers in the world, believes that Yellen will continue to print money, and follow her predecessors Ben Bernane and Alan Greenspan, and ensure that the Federal Reserve continues to run an easy money policy in the process.
As Grantham puts it in 
Ignoble Prizes and Appointmentshis most recent quarterly newsletter “My personal view is that the Greenspan-Bernanke regime of excessive stimulus, now administered by Yellen, will proceed as usual, and that the path of least resistance, for the market will be up.”
And this will mean stock market rallies not only in the United States but all over the world, including in emerging markets like India. “My personal guess is that the U.S. market, especially the non-blue chips, will work its way higher, perhaps by 20% to 30% in the next year or, more likely, two years, with the rest of the world including emerging market equities covering even more ground in at least a partial catch-up,” writes Grantham.
What is interesting is that another veteran of the US markets and one of its foremost investment newsletter writers Richard Russel has had something similar to say in the recent past. Russel in a recent note titled 
Get Ready for the Mania Phase explained that there are three phases to any bull market. In the first phase the wise and seasoned investors enter the market and pick up stocks which are going dirt cheap, because of the previous bear market.
In the second phase, which happens to be the longest and the most deceptive phase, retail investors flirt with stocks and buy them very carefully and not on a regular basis. In the third and final phase of the bull market investors really take to stocks. As Russel writes “The third or speculative phase of a bull market is characterized by a wild and wooly and ever-increasing entrance by the retail public. This phase is characterized by hot tips, hype and pure greed.”
This third and final phase of the bull market has started in the United States, feels Russel. “This is where I think we are now in this bull market. I believe that during the next 12 months we will experience a surprising and ever-expanding rush by the “mom and pop” public to enter the market. At the same time, veteran investors and institutions will seize the opportunity to distribute stock that they may have held for years,” he writes.
And this phenomenon along with the easy money policy of the Federal Reserve will lead to a global rally in stocks. As Russel puts it “All primary movements are international in scope, and this bull market will be no exception.”
The trouble of course is that this rally will not be based on any fundamentals, but just a lot of easy money chasing stocks. And that is something that cannot last beyond a while. The bubble will burst and there will be a lot of pain. As Grantham puts it “And then we will have the third in the series of serious market busts since 1999 and presumably Greenspan, Bernanke, Yellen, et al. will rest happy, for surely they must expect something like this outcome given their experience. And we the people, of course, will get what we deserve.”

The article originally appeared on www.firstpost.com on November 30, 2013
(Vivek Kaul is a writer. He tweets @kaul_vivek)

Advertisements

About vivekkaul
Vivek Kaul is a writer who has worked at senior positions with the Daily News and Analysis(DNA) and The Economic Times, in the past. He is the author of the Easy Money trilogy. Easy Money: The Greatest Ponzi Scheme Ever and How It Is Set to Destroy the Global Financial System , the latest book in the trilogy has just been published. The first two books in the trilogy were published in November 2013 and July 2014 respectively. Both the books were bestsellers on Amazon.com and Amazon.in. Currently he works as an economic commentator and writes regular columns for www.firstpost.com. He is also the India editor of The Daily Reckoning newsletter published by www.equitymaster.com. His writing has appeared across various other publications in India. These include The Times of India, Business Standard,Business Today, Business World, The Hindu, The Hindu Business Line, Indian Management, The Asian Age, Deccan Chronicle, Forbes India, Mutual Fund Insight, The Free Press Journal, Quartz.com, DailyO.in, Business World, Huffington Post and Wealth Insight. In the past he has also been a regular columnist for www.rediff.com. He has lectured at IIM Bangalore, IIM Indore, TA PAI Institute of Management and the Alliance University (Bangalore). He has also taught a course titled Indian Economy to the PGPMX batch of IIM Indore. His areas of interest are the intersection between politics and economics, the international financial crisis, personal finance, marketing and branding, and anything to do with cinema and music. He can be reached at vivek.kaul@gmail.com

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: